The Week Leading up to… Sunday, October 20, 2013.

The Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost

Schedule for this week:

·         Wednesday, October 16, 5:30 p.m.: Small Compline, followed by Bible Study (led by Fr. Henry)

·         Saturday, October 19, 5:00 pm: Great Vespers

·         Sunday, October 20, 10:00 am: Divine Liturgy (preceded by Third Hour, 9:45 am)

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Quote for the Week:

“…those who have suffered for Christ are adorned forever with their wounds. Windows in a house do not make it less safe and are not something ugly but a necessary decoration for a building, to let in light and allow those within to look out. In the same way, the body’s sufferings for Christ’s sake and the resultant wounds become for those who bear them windows to let in the light without evening. And when that light shines forth they will be recognizable by the divine beauty and radiance of their wounds and not by their ugliness. Their scars will not be obliterated when suffering comes to an end, in so far as they procure immortality.”

From St. Gregory Palamas (Homily Seventeen, paragraph 19, The Homilies Vol. 1; St. Tikhon’s Seminary Press pgs. 221-222)

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THE EPISTLE

St. Paul’s Second Letter to the Corinthians (6:16-18; 7:1)

Prokeimenon. Mode Plagal 4.
Psalm 75.11,1

Make your vows to the Lord our God and perform them.
Verse: God is known in Judah; his name is great in Israel.

BRETHREN, you are the temple of the living God; as God said, “I will live in them and move among them, and I will be their God, and they shall be my people. Therefore come out from them, and be separate from them, says the Lord, and touch nothing unclean; then I will welcome you, and I will be a father to you, and you shall be my sons and daughters, says the Lord Almighty.”

Since we have these promises, beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from every defilement of body and spirit, and make holiness perfect in the fear of God.

THE GOSPEL

The Reading from the Gospel of Saint Luke (8:26-39)

At that time, as Jesus arrived at the country of the Gadarenes, there met him a man from the city who had demons; for a long time he had worn no clothes and he lived not in a house but among the tombs. When he saw Jesus, he cried out and fell down before him, and said with a loud voice, “What have you to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God? I beseech you, do not torment me.” For he had commanded the unclean spirit to come out of the man. (For many a time it had seized him; he was kept under guard, and bound with chains and fetters, but he broke the bonds and was driven by the demon into the desert.) Jesus then asked him, “What is your name?” And he said, “Legion”; for many demons had entered him. And they begged him not to command them to depart into the abyss. Now a large herd of swine was feeding there on the hillside; and they begged him to let them enter these. So he gave them leave. Then the demons came out of the man and entered the swine, and the herd rushed down the steep bank into the lake and were drowned. When the herdsmen saw what happened, they fled, and told it in the city and in the country. Then people went out to see what had happened, and they came to Jesus, and found the man from whom the demons had gone, sitting at the feet of Jesus, clothed and in his right mind; and they were afraid. And those who had seen it told them how he who had been possessed with demons was healed. Then all the people of the surrounding country of the Gadarenes asked him to depart from them; for they were seized with great fear; so he got into the boat and returned. The man from whom the demons had gone begged that he might be with him; but he sent him away, saying, “Return to your home, and declare how much God has done for you.” And he went away, proclaiming throughout the whole city how much Jesus had done for him.

Commemorated on this Sunday:

Saint Artemios the Great-Martyr of Antioch

Saint Artemios the Great-Martyr of Antioch

(Icon from The Orthodox Pages by Father Christopher Klitou)

Holy Great Martyr Artemius (362)
He came from a noble family, and was appointed military Governor of Alexandria and Egypt by the Emperor Constantine the Great. Some years later, the Emperor Julian the Apostate strove to restore pagan idolatry as the official religion of the Empire. He also entered into a war with Persia, and established Antioch as his headquarters for pursuing the war. In Alexandria, Artemius received an order to come to Antioch with the military forces under his command. Artemius reported to the apostate Emperor just in time to see him ordering the cruel execution of two pious Christians, Eugenius and Macarius. Fearlessly, Saint Artemius immediately denounced the Emperor, telling him to his face that his anti-Christian policy was of demonic origin. The enraged Emperor instantly had Artemius stripped of all official rank and thrown into prison. The following day, he had Artemius brought before him and promised him high Imperial office if he would only renounce Christ and worship the idols. When Artemius forcefully refused to do this, he was publicly tortured to death. A pious noblewoman secretly recovered the Saint’s relics and took them to Constantinople, where they were venerated and wrought many miracles for several centuries.
                                                                                                                                                                                           (from abbamoses.com)

During the regular Sundays of the Church year, we each Sunday move through a repeating cycle of eight Tones, with different music and hymns for each tone, which celebrate the resurrection of Christ. This Sunday falls on Tone 8. Here is the Sunday troparion (hymn) of the Resurrection for this Sunday:

From the heights thou didst descend O Compassionate One,

and thou didst submit to the three-day burial,

that thou might deliver us from passion.

Thou art our Life and our Resurrection, O Lord, glory to thee.

Click here to listen to this troparion being sung, and here for sheet music.

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