The Week Leading up to… Sunday, November 3, 2013.

The Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Schedule for this week:

·         Wednesday, October 30, 5:30 p.m.: Small Compline, followed by Bible Study (led by Fr. Henry)

·         Saturday, November 2, 5:00 pm: Great Vespers

·         Sunday, November 3, 10:00 am: Divine Liturgy (preceded by Orthros, 9:00 am)

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Quote for the Week:

“…reflect on the fact that water is cold by nature, but when it is poured into a kettle and put on the fire, it all but forgets its own nature and moves across to the energy of that which has dominated it. In the same way, although we are corruptible because of the nature of the flesh, we too through our mingling with Life abandon our own weakness and are transformed into its property, that is to say, into life. For it was absolutely necessary, not only that our soul should be re-created into newness of life by the Holy Spirit, but also that this coarse and earthly body should be sanctified by a coarser but analogous participation [in the Body and Blood of the Lord] and called to incorruption.”

– From St. Cyril of Alexandria (Cyril Of Alexandria: The Early Church Fathers by Norman Russell, Commentary on John 6:53; Routledge pg. 116)

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The Resurrection Gospel of Orthros

The Reading from the Holy Gospel of Saint John (20:11-18)

At that time, Mary stood weeping outside the tomb, and as she wept she stooped to look into the tomb; and she saw two angels in white, sitting where the body of Jesus had lain, one at the head and one at the feet. They said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping?” She said to them, “Because they have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid Him.” Saying this, she turned round and saw Jesus standing, but she did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping? Whom do you seek?” Supposing Him to be the gardener, she said to Him, “Sir, if you have carried Him away, tell me where you have laid Him, and I will take Him away.” Jesus said to her, “Mary.” She turned and said to him in Hebrew, “Rabboni!” (which means Teacher). Jesus said to her, “Do not hold me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father; but go to my brethren and say to them, I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.” Mary Magdalene went and said to the disciples, “I have seen the Lord”; and she told them that He had said these things to her.

THE EPISTLE

The Reading from Saint Paul’s Second Letter to the Corinthians (11:31-33; 12:1-9)

Prokeimenon. Mode 2.
Psalm 117.14,18

The Lord is my strength and my song.
Verse: The Lord has chastened me sorely.

BRETHREN, the God and Father of the Lord Jesus, he who is blessed for ever, knows that I do not lie. At Damascus, the governor under King Aretas guarded the city of Damascus in order to seize me, but I was let down in a basket through a window in the wall, and escaped his hands.

I must boast; there is nothing to be gained by it, but I will go on to visions and revelations of the Lord. I know a man in Christ who fourteen years ago was caught up to the third heaven-whether in the body or out of the body I do not know, God knows. And I know that this man was caught up into Paradise-whether in the body or out of the body I do not know, God knows-and he heard things that cannot be told, which man may not utter. On behalf of this man I will boast, but on my own behalf I will not boast, except of my weaknesses. Though if I wish to boast, I shall not be a fool, for I shall be speaking the truth. But I refrain from it, so that no one may think more of me than he sees in me or hears from me. And to keep me from being too elated by the abundance of revelations, a thorn was given me in the flesh, a messenger of Satan, to harass me, to keep me from being too elated. Three times I besought the Lord about this, that it should leave me; but he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” I will all the more gladly boast of my weaknesses, that the power of Christ may rest upon me.

THE GOSPEL

The Reading from the Holy Gospel according to Saint Luke (16:19-31)

The Lord said, “There was a rich man, who was clothed in purple and fine linen and who feasted sumptuously every day. And at his gate lay a poor man named Lazaros, full of sores, who desired to be fed with what fell from the rich man’s table; moreover the dogs came and licked his sores. The poor man died and was carried by the angels to Abraham’s bosom. The rich man also died and was buried; and in Hades, being in torment, he lifted up his eyes, and saw Abraham far off and Lazaros in his bosom. And he called out, ‘Father Abraham, have mercy upon me, and send Lazaros to dip the end of his finger in water and cool my tongue; for I am in anguish in this flame.’ But Abraham said, ‘Son, remember that you in your lifetime received your good things, and Lazaros in like manner evil things; but now he is comforted here, and you are in anguish. And besides all this, between us and you a great chasm has been fixed, in order that those who would pass from here to you may not be able, and none may cross from there to us.’ And he said, ‘Then I beg you, father, to send him to my father’s house, for I have five brothers, so that he may warn them, lest they also come into this place of torment.’ But Abraham said, ‘They have Moses, and the prophets; let them hear them.’ And he said, ‘No, father Abraham; but if some one goes to them from the dead, they will repent.’ He said to them, ‘If they do not hear Moses and the prophets, neither will they be convinced if some one should rise from the dead.'”

During the Sundays of the Church year, we each Sunday move through a repeating cycle of eight Tones, with different music and hymns for each tone, which celebrate the resurrection of Christ. This Sunday falls on Tone 2. Here is the Sunday troparion (hymn) of the Resurrection for this Sunday:

When Thou didst submit Thyself unto death,
O Thou deathless and immortal One,
then Thou didst destroy hell with Thy Godly power.
And when Thou didst raise the dead from beneath the earth,
all the powers of Heaven did cry aloud unto Thee:
O Christ, Thou giver of life, glory to Thee.
Click here to listen to this troparion being sung, and here for sheet music.

November 3

Holy Martyrs Acepsimas the bishop, Joseph the priest and Aithalas the deacon (378-379)
King Shapur II of Persia conducted a fierce persecution of Christians in his realm for thirty-seven years. In the final years of this persecution he gave his magi authority to torture and kill any Christians who would not renounce their faith. Acepsimas, the aged and holy Bishop of Paka, was arrested along with Joseph the priest and Aithalas the deacon. All not only refused to deny Christ, but boldly preached Him before the magi and the king. The enraged king had them viciously tortured, then, as a final indignity, made prisoners of all the local Christians and forced them to stone their own shepherds to death. With their martyrdom the great persecution in Persia came to an end.
Holy Virgin Martyr Winefride of Treffynnon (Holywell), Wales (7th c.)
“Saint Winefride (in Welsh, Gwenfrewi) was a maiden of noble birth who lived in North wales in the seventh century. The niece and spiritual daughter of Saint Beuno (21 April), she entered the Monastery of Gwytherin after his death, where she lived under the spiritual direction of Saint Eleril. The son of a neighbouring chieftan, Caradoc by name, seized by an unchaste passion, pursued her and struck off her head with a sword. The spot where her head fell became known as Treffynnon or Holywell, because of the appearing of a healing spring for those who would take its waters with faith. Holywell remains a great place of pilgrimage in Britain to this day.” (Synaxarion)
Saint Winifred with Scenes from Her LifeSaint Winifred of Wales, with Scenes from her Life
(Icon from Orthodox Outlet for Dogmatic Inquiries website)

Commemorated on this Sunday:

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